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LOATH / LOATHE

 
To loathe means 'to hate'. Loath means 'unwilling'.
 

Writers occasionally confuse 'loath' and 'loathe'.  Their meanings are related as they both relate to not liking something.

Loathe

Loathe is a verb meaning 'to hate'. In fact, many consider it even stronger than 'to hate'.  It can also be translated as 'to hate intensely'.  

Examples:

She will eat just about anything, but she loathes celery. 

I loved the Army as an institution and loathed every single thing it required me to do.

Loath

Loath is an adjective meaning 'unwilling'.  

Examples:

She is loath to join, because her friends play for a rival team.

Magazines and newspapers are loath to discuss these types of deals
publicly.

At daybreak, when loathe to rise, have this thought in thy mind: I am rising for a man's work.
(should be 'loath')
 
Select the correct version:

 
EVEN IN SPEECH

People confuse loathe and loath even when talking. Note:

Loathe ends in a soft 'th' sound.  It rhymes with 'betroth'.

Loath ends in a hard 'th' sound.  It rhymes with the 'oath' or 'both'.
Associated lessons:
 
What are adjectives?
What are verbs?
List of easily confused words
 
 

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